About Zemgale | Discover Latvia Tours
Husky Dog Sledding through the forests | Tour Husky Dog Sledding on the Countryside
Race Dog Sledding on the countryside of Latvia | Tour Husky Dog Sledding on the Countryside 4 km
Husky dog sledding through the forests | Tour Husky Dog Sledding 3km
In the deer safari | Tour Latvia Winter Tour
Turaida Museum Reserve | Tour Tour to Sigulda
Husky dog sledding through the fields | Tour Husky Dog Sledding 5km
Līgatne Nature Trails forest | Tour Latvia Winter Tour
River Gauja valley | Tour Latvia Winter Tour
Deers | Tour Latvia Winter Tour
Turaida Museum Reserve, Hill of Dainas | Tour Tour to Sigulda
Sunset in the forest | Tour Husky Dog Sledding 5 km
Nature trails | Tour Latvia Winter Tour
We are feeding deers on a cold day | Tour Latvia Winter Tour
River Gauja valley in Sigulda | Tour Tour to Sigulda
Turaida Museum Reserve | Tour Tour to Sigulda
Nature trails | Tour Latvia Winter Tour

About Zemgale

Zemgale, also known under Latinized names Semigalia or Semigallia (Latvian: Zemgale; German: Semgallen; Lithuanian: Žiemgala) is an historical region of Latvia, sometimes also including a part of Lithuania. The region takes its name from the Baltic people known as Semigallians. Zemgale lies left of the Daugava River and borders Selonia, Lithuania, and Courland.

Zemgale- Broad field land

Kurzeme
  • Ventspils
  • Kuldīga
Within Latvia, Zemgale has the status of one of four historical and cultural regions of Latvia. It lies in the middle of the southern part of the Republic of Latvia, and consists of Bauska, Dobele, and Jelgava counties (rajons). The land is mostly flat. The Lielupe is the most important river after the Daugava. Important towns are Jelgava, the former capital of the Duchy of Courland and Semigalia, and Bauska. In the Middle Ages Semigalia was included within Courland and passed with that territory to Latvia after World War I. The region of Selonia is often included as part of Semigalia. Selonia comprises the eastern part of the 1939 province of Semigalia, an area completely located south of the Daugava River. Traditional Selonia also includes a portion of northeastern Lithuania. It takes its name from the Baltic tribe of the Selonians.